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California Desert Protection Act turns 10

Ten years ago on Oct. 31, 1994, a small group of Californians gathered in the Oval Office as President Bill Clinton signed into law the California Desert Protection Act, the largest land bill passed in that decade. Like most such events, this represented the culmination of years of effort by hundreds of people. On this anniversary, it is worthwhile to look briefly on how it all came together.

What have you done for Planet Earth lately?

Less butts in the ocean thanks to Steve.

Act locally--now more than ever

Senior Chapter Director

2004 is over. We have come through a very difficult and hard-fought presidential election. Most of us are dismayed at the prospect of another four years of an administration dedicated to favoring corporate profits over national parks. Environmental laws have been dismantled and ignored under the Bush administration, and there is no reason to think his second term will be any different.

A year well spent

In presidential election years, political action always takes a front-row seat in Angeles Chapter activities. And although the Democrats, and the Sierra Club, lost the Big One in 2004, the Chapter was outstanding at supporting winning candidates at the local level. Politics didn't eclipse conservation, however. The Chapter remained at the forefront of important battles in Los Angeles and Orange counties to:

Ó defend open space and wildlife where suburban sprawl directly threatens wild land,

Chapter to cruise Alaska's Inside Passage this May

and Donna Specht

'Go,' said John Muir after two cruises to Alaska, to readers of the San Francisco Chronicle, 'Go and see! Alaska is marvelous.'

Muir's century-old accounts can be used as a guide for modern ship-borne tourists. He was no ordinary tourist, and if some fellow travelers thought his wild enthusiasm for Alaska crazy, others grasped his sense of gratified amazement. For it was here that Muir found confirmation of his theories regarding glaciation and plant progression in the Sierra Nevada.

Meet Your Chapter

Palos Verdes-South Bay Group

The facts

Founded in 1965

Serves the 4,000 Sierra Club members residing in San Pedro, Torrance, Redondo Beach, Palos Verdes Peninsula, Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach, Lawndale, Wilmington, Gardena, Carson, Lomita, and Harbor City

Number of currently active leaders: 54

The fun stuff

Santa Clarita development poses as smart growth

and DeLise Keim

The Sierra Club has officially opposed the proposed Las Lomas development in the Newhall Pass just north of Sylmar, at the northwest corner of the Interstate 5 and State Route 14 interchange.

Hazardous household waste disposal

Trying to make sense of regulations can be hazardous to your patience. Being green in one's everyday affairs always involves a little extra work. Separating garbage, carpooling, and all the other small things we might do to preserve our environment require some sacrifice, but they are simple tasks that are well-publicized as the right things to do. Therefore, when it comes to things we must do, or in fact are legally obligated to do, one would hope that these activities would be broadly communicated to the public and relatively easy to comply with.

Club youth group gives award to Mexican rock band for commitment to environment

On Thanksgiving eve, young environmental crusaders Juan Martinez and Andrew Anderson presented the Mexican rock band, Maná, with a Sierra Club-sponsored Green Award at the La Banda Elastica Latin Alternative Music Awards.

'Maná's work is really cool because you wouldn't think that rockers would be interested in things of the earth, but I am glad they do because we need everyone's help' said Anderson.

Voracious invader: Nonnative snakehead wreaks havoc

Imagine a fresh water fish that can grow to the size of a rolled-up tent, has an appetite so voracious that it feeds on small mammals, and has reportedly killed humans with its razor-sharp teeth. Now imagine that this fish, after clearing a lake of all food sources, can emerge on the shore and squirm across land for days on its dorsal fins to find a new loch filled with fresh prey.

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